Alisi Telengut

RETHINKING ANIMISM AS TRANS-CORPOREAL EXISTENCES

By re-conceptualizing the idea of animism and drawing on the notion of transcorporeality, other-than-human entities are agential and vital in the human to non-human political ecology. This new usage of animism emphasizes the connectivity, fluidity and relationality of entities. It is of fluid, relational, post-anthropocentric paradigms where indigenous and other cosmologies have been reconsidered and reclaimed for re-imagining a symbiotic meshwork of interdependence. Re-thinking animism helps deconstruct the animate/inanimate dualism of modernity’s orders and entails a rejection of anthropocentrism. The interchanges between human corporeality and the other-than-human world signify that fleshy and immediate human embodied existences are intimately imbricated with nature and the environment. By reconsidering the animacy/agency of nature, it reminds us to be respectful and responsive in the shared presence with the non-human. To be responsive is to bring climate change home as a transcorporeal and intra-active phenomenon, where weather bodies, climate-time, and nature-culture are deeply entangled.

Alisi Telengut
© Alisi Telengut

Alisi Telengut is a Canadian artist of Mongolian origin. Her work has received multiple international awards and nominations, including from the Stockholm Film Festival (Sweden), Mammoth Lakes Film Festival (USA) and Aspen Shortsfest (USA). They have been exhibited internationally at galleries and festivals, such as at Sundance (USA), TIFF (Canada), the Canadian Cultural Centre at the Embassy of Canada (France), CICA Museum (South Korea), among others. Alisi’s recent work has been added to the permanent collection of Art Science Exhibits Berlin (Germany) that represents the leading-edge of art-making with dedication to positive action for Earth’s recovery.